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east have more experience with terrorism. and their security environment reflect that reality. but here in the u.s., there is a delicate balancing act between liberty and security. and it's still a work in progress. bret? >> bret: steve centanni live here in d.c. steve, thank you. some of the most compelling accounts to come out of boston are from the eyewitnesses. and the people who tried to help. correspondent douglas kennedy has that part of the story. [explosion] >> the bomb that where to through boilston street took with it lives and dreams. in fact, many people in boston and the nation. especially those who saw the mayhem firsthand. >> it went off, you know, my ears, you know, just from the compression of the explosive device hit us and shattered the window next to us. and, you know, and i looked back and i see a cloud of smoke. >> it took probably five or ten seconds to realize what had happened because it couldn't happen there. so, it was just too surreal. >> still personal tragedy quickly turned into communal hope as the city almost instantly came together. to comfort the falle
and the rest of the middle east have more experience with terrorism. and their security environment reflect that reality. but here in the u.s., there is a delicate balancing act between liberty and security. and it's still a work in progress. bret? >> bret: steve centanni live here in d.c. steve, thank you. some of the most compelling accounts to come out of boston are from the eyewitnesses. and the people who tried to help. correspondent douglas kennedy has that part of the story. [explosion] >> the bomb that where to through boilston street took with it lives and dreams. in fact, many people in boston and the nation. especially those who saw the mayhem firsthand. >> it went off, you know, my ears, you know, just from the compression of the explosive device hit us and shattered the window next to us. and, you know, and i looked back and i see a cloud of smoke. >> it took probably five or ten seconds to realize what had happened because it couldn't happen there. so, it was just too surreal. >> still personal tragedy quickly turned into communal hope as the city almost instantly came togethe
random metal and debris things picked up from the environment. all of that being pulled out of the bombing victims, bill. >> bill: tomorrow is going to be another emotional day. what are the plans as we understand them tonight, mike for the presidents visit at that church behind you? >> well, the president will come here to the cathedral of the holy cross just about 11:00. he will be accompanied by the first lady. it will be an interfaith service. the president is said to be delivering a message of shared pain not just with the people who were in the run itself or the people who live here in boston but the people -- the people in the run itself. and a shared sense of respect to the people who responded and saved lives. no word now if the president intends to visit with the victims and/or their families, bill. >> bill: mike, thanks. see you tomorrow. mike tobin from the church tonight. we are also hearing tonight from a hero by the name of tyler who helped comfort a young woman suffering shrapnel wounds from the terrorist attacks. yesterday the massachusetts governor devol pa
ripe environment, target rich environment. it's just tragic to go from this horrific scene, i think everybody was just shocked, but i'll tell you what, i'm angry. i know a lot of other people are angry. i got a text, a long text from doug flutie, former quarterback, as you know, boston college fame, saying where do i sign up? who do we go and get? you see joann drowsy helping out a -- andruzi helping out. we're going to do a top to bottom review of what went right and wrong and make sure it doesn't happen again. >> steve: i understand the anger. but you look at all the first responders, all the police officers, all the national guardsmen who were there yesterday. the city was vigilant. yet it just takes one. >> listen, it does take one. certainly because it is the marathon, it is the showcase, really of the city and the state, you have all those people there anyway. thank goodness they were actually there because the first responders, the medical personnel, the tents are right there. they're able to adjust from high duration to almost like a war type of reaction, type of force to pr
something. if you see somebody carrying something odd that doesn't fit in the environment, you should seek out law enforcement and bring it to their attention. >> gretchen: you say to look at the people around you. even to the point of no problem staring at them. why? >> yes. as people, we don't like to look at people. anything more than two seconds, you're scary and being rude. you know what? be rude. pay attention to who is next to you. what are they wearing? how do they look? how are they carrying themselves? look at their behaviors. what are they communicating to you not just verbally, but nonverbally. >> gretchen: know where you will evacuate. oftentimes when people get on airplanes, they'll say i'm five rows from the nearest exit. you're talking about just in general, right? >> yes. whether indoors or outdoors. this specific event, you're barricaded in in an area. you're watching the marathon go on. when you get there, assess. if something happens, i want two ways out. if something happens on this side, i will go out this way. if something happens on this side, i will go out that way
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5